Jib boom vs dangly pole

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Chris G
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Joined: Fri Nov 13, 2020 2:28 pm

Jib boom vs dangly pole

Post by Chris G » Sun Nov 15, 2020 4:55 pm

Hi All,

Second question and post!!

New to Canoes and looking at possibly fitting a boom arrangement over the winter to get the jib out square for downwind etc. I can't seem to find out any information on suitable fittings especially for where the boom pivots at the forestay? Any thoughts or useful info gratefully received!

Also has anyone tried/used a fly away/dangly pole arrangement? Used on N12's and Ents Details of the Enterprise system here:-
http://www.sailenterprise.co.uk/wp-cont ... -Poles.pdf

I see no reason it wouldn't work on the Canoe and seems fairly simple to fit but wondered it anyone had any experiences trying it?

Thanks http://www.sailenterprise.co.uk/wp-cont ... -Poles.pdf

Chris G

jimc
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Re: Jib boom vs dangly pole

Post by jimc » Sun Nov 15, 2020 5:34 pm

Yes, dangly poles have been used, by myself for one, but the consensus is that the boom setup is better on the whole, which is the conclusion I reached too. I would have thought there was some discussion hereabouts.

Chris G
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Re: Jib boom vs dangly pole

Post by Chris G » Mon Nov 16, 2020 1:32 pm

Thanks Jim. Any chance of photos of boom setup's or fittings?

Chris

Chris G
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Joined: Fri Nov 13, 2020 2:28 pm

Re: Jib boom vs dangly pole

Post by Chris G » Mon Nov 16, 2020 7:09 pm

viewtopic.php?f=9&t=1746

This is a link to a discussion awhile back. Best picture I've been able to find.
Couple of queries. Is the leach tension line setup for the conditions or adjustable on the water?
What dia of carbon tube is man enough for the job? Seems it needs a pretty big hole to accommodate the swivel? What reinforcement is needed?

jimc
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Re: Jib boom vs dangly pole

Post by jimc » Tue Nov 17, 2020 6:39 pm

It's a safe bet that pretty much everything on most front half of fleet ICs is adjustable on the water, but I can't imagine the jib leech tension being anything other than critical. Most of the poles I've seen have been fabricated from multiple pieces of tube, and yes, much larger section in the immediate vicinity of the pivot than anywhere else. Typically the piece ahead of the tack will be at a significant angle to the piece from tack to clew in order to provide plenty of clearance and better leverage for the adjustment.

I'm not aware of anything on the forum that's intended to work and doesn't work. If anyone spots anything I would like to hear. It's never been policy to have attachments hosted here. I'm not sure what limits there are on our hosting deal, but that would be the most likely reason. Probably worth looking through image galleries on UK and Int Web sites for photos of jib boom arrangements, but if someone would like to write up how they made theirs with photos it would be an excellent thing to have on the Web pages.

jimc
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Re: Jib boom vs dangly pole

Post by jimc » Tue Nov 17, 2020 6:47 pm

Image
You're right though, I don't seem to have much in the way of technical photos.

Chris G
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Re: Jib boom vs dangly pole

Post by Chris G » Tue Nov 17, 2020 10:01 pm

Looks like the jib sheet is attached to the boom rather than the clew? I was assuming the boom did basically nothing upwind and the twist was controlled conventionally and the boom only controlled the leach off wind hence not as critical.

perhamh
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Re: Jib boom vs dangly pole

Post by perhamh » Wed Nov 18, 2020 7:32 pm

Jib sheets attach to clew.

Drawbacks of non-adjustable tension are:
- in a blow, when you need lots of tension to control the leach downwind, that same tension means the jib is fairly powered-up through the tack, even when the sheet is freed. Puts a premium on tacking skills.
- in lighter weather, when you let off the leeward shroud, you're also messing with the jib leach tension and have no way to crank more on.

That said, non-adjustable is simpler than adjustable, and probably better than nothing - though maybe a battened jib could mimic some of the benefit, improve end-plate effect, save weight and make the whole set-up simpler still. Not every Canoe sailor's goal, I know, but simplicity afloat has a lot going for it.

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