Class Promotion

Use this forum to discuss the latest changes in the class
Phil Stevenson
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Post by Phil Stevenson » Fri Aug 18, 2006 7:55 am

I think I am in the same age group as Jim and Paul, Bach is more my scene than punk, even though I am a fan of Hitchhiker's Guide.
Design perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing else to add but when there is nothing else which can be taken away.
http://philscanoes.blogspot.com/

Peter Wells
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Post by Peter Wells » Fri Aug 18, 2006 4:11 pm

:)I am far too old to be in your target audience but the latest design is eyecatching and gives the right message. And yes, I am old enough to remember that "kissing your sister" created no controversy at all, but perhaps we were innocent in those days.

Naturally, I prefer Bach to Punk!

Good luck for a successful Championship
Peter Wells

Roland Whitehead
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Post by Roland Whitehead » Fri Aug 18, 2006 9:54 pm

Well I rather like "Weapon of choice" - its just that others might be a bit sensitive. The last time I was in McCrae I was really wishing for a weapon to do damage to Channel 5 heli-camera crews (travelled all those miles to watch a bunch of Seppos break up their machine within 30 minutes of my arrival) but none were at hand. Come to think about it, I could have done with a weapon on my previous trip but would probably have used it on myself (you need to know some good history about my relationship with McCrae for that one - perhaps Steve might let on as he did rather better there than I did...).


Paul Scott
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Post by Paul Scott » Sat Aug 19, 2006 3:59 am

Chris-

Good step forward! Hey, if any of you would like a copy of My cd, Essays, let me know, and I'll send you one, gratis. Usually I would say listen to it on a download, but the cd is pretty audiophile in nature, and downloading doesn't do it justice. If you do not like it, that's ok, they make good skeet! I had sailing a single person high performance sailboat in mind (in about 12K, lumpy seas) when I came up with the interpretation, so you guys will get it. You too, Chris- no strings attached- that is you don't have to use it if you don't want to.. All I ask is that you don't copy or broadcast it for $$$, and I get credit for any non commercial use of the recording, etc. I don't usually do this, so it's a limited offer (!) to IC people who have been posting here.

Paul 8)
"Exuberance is better than good taste" -Flaubert

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Christian AUS
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Post by Christian AUS » Sat Aug 19, 2006 5:16 am

Paul,
Cheers, I'll have a listen but you probably have the mental image of what you want for your music. Have a go at putting pics etc to yours, I'd be interested to see what a muso could come up with

Paul Scott
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Post by Paul Scott » Mon Aug 21, 2006 5:07 am

Christian-

Actually my mental image (in my mind's eye) is very much the flow of images you have presented. My concentration as a musician is more at the the music as an emotional subtext to the images- sort of a related ambient wall of sound (apologies to Mr. Spectre) that the images stand in front of. There.

Paul
"Exuberance is better than good taste" -Flaubert

Paul Scott
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Post by Paul Scott » Mon Aug 21, 2006 4:11 pm

I thought I'd expand on my idea ofvideo w/music. L. F. Herreschoff wrote a description of a sailing canoe a bit old fashioned in style, but generally sums up my image of a sailing canoe-

"...the sailing canoe has more beauty, longevity, and we might say, verve, than any of the man made objects. In what I am saying I am referring to the so called decked sailing canoe with a sliding seat, and I use the word "verve" because almost nothing else will express the lively movements of a sailing canoe when she is sailing in a good breeze and a chop of a sea."

"On a usual sailboat one cannot see her in action even if he can feel her movements, but when one is out on the slding seat he has a picture before him that is most thrilling He sees the stem of the canoe as it kinifes t's way through the water, often (from his point of view) throwing up a halo of spray which takes on rainbow hues. Now she pitches slightly till her stem head is under water, now she raises her forfoot and planes out three or four feet, always changing her wave formation, always dancing, always jumping forward, and all the while under the sliding seat the water whizzes by. It seems to move like lightning whis is because the sailor is always in such close proximity to the moving water. At times his seat just clears it, and at times it dips into it. He sees beore him the centerboard and the rudder clearly silhouetted in the moving tide. In fact when the sun is opposite him, if the water is clear, he sees the whole outboard profile of the bottom. At these times his sensations of speed are more pronounced even than in flying.... It is a fact that a skilful sailor can be capsized in a decked sailing canoe and right her again without getting wet above the knees..."

Perhaps, though, the most appealing thing about the sailing canoe is her sheer beauty... No other craft has such perfection in her fittings and finish, no other craft is as nicely modelled. As she rests on the beach beside the water, with her delicate wings stretched above her...hull, she seems more akin to some great flying fish than the handiwork of man."

"... the canoist depends on his agility at moving in and out on the sliding seat to keep her upright. This is quite a different procedure from sailing a dinghy, where the sheet is best carried in hand ready for slacking away. While it takes a little practice to sail withthe sheets belayed, after confidence is acquired the decked canoe is a remarkably seaworthy craft and a skillful sailor can drive her through conditions that would swamp or capsize the open dinghy..."

-L Francis Herreshoff, The Common Sense of Yacht Design, pages 144-146, published 1946.

If any one has a video from the perspective of the helmsman of a canoe sailing that lasts at least 2 min 38 sec, and in general looks like the description that L Francis gives of sailing a canoe above (but not with the capsizing part), let me know, and we can figure out some way to get it on the web. Failing that, maybe L. Francis' description could be displayed in text with some pictures from the helm's perspective with the Prelude from the 1st Bach suite in the background.

That is this muso's idea. Any reactions? It's a bit more poetic vision than the Right Weapon approach, but I can see both approaches coexisting. Might even bring some of the fairer sex, like my wife, into the class.

Paul
"Exuberance is better than good taste" -Flaubert

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Christian AUS
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Post by Christian AUS » Tue Aug 22, 2006 3:42 am

Remember, if you like things like the slideshow http://www.internationalcanoe.yachting. ... h_0001.wmv

or even the Logo's, put them up as links on you club or class websites (or your own websites)
Email them to people who would like them or are interested in the class.
Refer to them on other forums.

It all goes into spreading the word about International Canoes

Paul Scott
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Post by Paul Scott » Wed Aug 30, 2006 5:24 pm

For what it's worth, I was talking to the Musto Rep down at the marina the other day, and he said that much to his surprise, most people were buying the Musto not to race, but just to go out and have fun on FAST. Kind of like a funboard, I guess. That's why I suggested the Herreschoff approach, above, which might tap into the funboard aproach, while also using the historical glow of the sailing canoe, which if I'm not mistaken, probably invented the funboard approach back in the 1800's. Yakaboo comes to mind. Although that was funboarding with a coat and tie, not a wetsuit- ind of a camping on a funboard approach, which lead to a go fast poetically approach, which lead to Uffa, and given that he developed the 2 up canoe and sailed it across the Channel to France for grins, I guess, I think that it could also be argued to be the fuboard approach. From what I've read, a lot of artists and writers etc. had sailing canoes with a seat (a la Paul Butler), and sailed them mainly for fun, introspection, or challenge. The purity of sailing an IC. Chris would know more about this, I bet.

Something to think about at any rate. I'm also told by my wife (and other women) that if there were races around stuff, like islands, etc., they would be more interested in the class. An itty bitty micro raid? Something to chew on for the future, perhaps. Back to the future? NOT CAMPING. Although one of the Geougeons brothers is doing a fair bit of canoe voyaging/camping. Not on an IC, though. Could be the reemergence of something though, that the IC could be part of. NOT THE CAMPING PART, but as a way to attract people up to the class: Read Small Craft Advisor, which is a pretty cool magazine. They might even be interested in the IC/D, as they do articles on high performance dinghies, etc. I'll get in touch with them, unless someone else wants to do it. They're local here (Port Townsend).

Paul
"Exuberance is better than good taste" -Flaubert

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