Life After IC Sailing

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Colin Newman
Posts: 240
Joined: Sun Sep 07, 2003 9:46 pm
Location: United Kingdom

Life After IC Sailing

Post by Colin Newman » Tue Oct 22, 2019 2:02 pm

In August last year after selling my new rules IC, I posted a 'goodbye and thank you' post to everyone in the class. Many thanks to those who responded with kind comments either on this forum or by individual e-mail.

In the belief that old friends just might be interested in one old man's experience of life after IC sailing, here goes with an up date. Before being able to move to Yorkshire to live near our twin grandsons Barbara and I had yet further frustrations with selling our house, but we eventually exchanged contracts on the day before Christmas Eve and actually moved on a cold, but dry January 11. We are now enjoying living in the house we bought, especially as we have had it extended to add a utility room and a garden room in which we now eat our meals. We recruited a good architect who recommended an excellent small building firm who got on and built the extension and refitted our kitchen all ahead of schedule. We now need to get the garden sorted so as to be easy to maintain as we get older.

Of course, the greatest joy of moving has been the opportunity for frequent contact with the twin boys and being of help to their parents. They are now two and a half so have their moments with temper tantrums and the like, but there are huge rewards having two small boys rushing to greet us on arrival at their house or when we help out the parents by doing their collection from nursery. We have once so far had the boys over night when the parents attended a party in London.

As for sailing. Last spring I joined Yorkshire Dales Sailing Club which sails at Grimwith Reservoir high up in the North Yorkshire moors, in an exposed position above any tree-line. The reservoir is about half the size of Draycote Water, it would be big enough for an IC, but I had earlier decided to move to something less demanding for my old age (77 this coming December). I discovered the club has a growing fleet of RS Aeros so I bought one, from a fellow club member, with both the 5sq M rig and the 7 for use on light wind days. I was made very welcome as I became oldest member still racing, especially by several club members who I have raced with at all comers opens in years gone by, many of Vortex sailing fame like Keith Esccrit (now in an Aero) and his brother! Initially I struggled with boat speed getting used to an unstayed rig, but just as I was starting to beat some of the other Aeros I had a health set back. My dicey heart with its leaking valves went into what has become permanent atrial fibrillation. With a fluttering, overly fast pulse and a heart now pumping blood with at best 80% of its previous efficiency, I was just too puffed and exhausted even trying to race a sitting out boat. On doctor's advice I was told to give up sailing and take only light to moderate exercise, so I sold the boat to another club member and resolved to make grandparenting my primary hobby! It is sad when health issues stop one doing what I previously loved, but I am so pleased we moved making it possible to fill the void with new family fun. Last Saturday, 'Nana' and I were 'playing hockey' with the twins and their mini sticks whist watching the parents who were playing home matches with the men's and women's teams of Leeds Hockey Club. May be I will still be fit enough in my eighties to get them into sailing? At least we have hit lucky with an excellent GP practice and after much experimenting with different pills they have managed to get my heart rate down to normal levels, albeit always irregular in its beat. I now feel relatively normal again but with limited spare energy. Our same very vigilant, caring new GP on Barbara's first signing on visit potentially saved her life! She was not sure a mole on her leg was normal, so referred her for tests and it was indeed malignant. However a speedy operation got rid of all the malignant melanoma cells. Everyone was so pleased the cancer was caught early, that might not have happened had we not moved to Yorkshire.

So there we have it, old IC sailors do not fade away all in one go, but turn their focus on the welfare of their heirs and successors. Keep the class thriving for Thomas and Samuel; unless I live to 100 I am unlikely to know if they become IC sailors or hockey experts! Samuel's eye-hand co-ordination and ball skills are remarked on by his nursery staff as exceptional for his age, whereas Thomas is much happier 'reading a book' on Granddad's lap, one of the joys of non-identical twins. Greetings to all who remember me from the past. My name can be found on the odd bit of class silverware, albeit a 'has been' like many others!

Cheers! Colin Newman

michael Brigg
Posts: 44
Joined: Mon Apr 12, 2010 10:52 am
Location: Gosport

Re: Life After IC Sailing

Post by michael Brigg » Tue Nov 26, 2019 12:08 pm

Hi Colin,

If you want to temp your grand-children into sailing in the UK the first thing you need is a warm wet suit, a suitable boat and fun, to persuade the children that they are wet bob's. :wink:

YOu may also need a long(ish) pocket! :?

It does seem to me that younger children are drawn to Toppers at this age. Much as I hate the boat, at this stage it does beat the Optimist hands down for fun and ease of sailing and is a genuine but surmountable challenge and an early introduction to a topper will persuade a child to want a more grown up boat at a younger age when a two handed boat such as a Mirror becomes a manageable challenge. Firstly it (the Topper) has enough canvas and buoyancy to take an adult to teach and chat to, but most importantly it is easy to jump out of and climb back in to, and at this age it is still a 2 man boat" suitable for playing with friends in. I would also recommend steamer suits that fit and when you have them on the beach this will prevent sunburn (make sure their mum knows this!) and keep them warm enough to enjoy swimming in the sea in the UK for more than 10 mins. Add in a buoyancy jacket and they will feel invincible! There is a healthy 2' hand market as everybody's children are steadily needing the next size up.

After age 6 just get the boat sailed by the local /nearest club.That way their peer group of friends will be sailors. And whatever you do don't let them go anywhere near horses!! :twisted:

My own 3 girls were seduced away from sailing by Hockey which has relatively intensive coaching on a Saturday or Sunday morning but relatively poor clubhouse facilities for children, unlike sailing where children have access to interesting landscapes (if lucky, even a beach) are often in the club all day long or even all week-end (if you have a club with rooms and dormitories this gives the added adventure of sleeping away from home,) and the delight of getting home with a manageable bag of washing and, best of all... A tidy house to come home to :lol: :lol:

So, your challenge fore the next decade begins!

Cheers,

Michael
Michael Brigg

K102 "Torment." Cold moulded Nethercott
K203 "Moonshadow" Carbon "Pyranha" Nethercott (Spare boat. Needs a polish)

Colin Newman
Posts: 240
Joined: Sun Sep 07, 2003 9:46 pm
Location: United Kingdom

Re: Life After IC Sailing

Post by Colin Newman » Tue Nov 26, 2019 12:31 pm

All sound advice! My son and his wife told us that before the twins arrived they did not mind if they had boys or girls (and they deliberately avoided being told in advance) but, after the boys arrived they were very pleased as it is far less likely they will want to go for horses! :lol:

Cheers Colin

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